Our work is on display and for sale at Burt Street Gallery, open every Saturday 10am-4pm.


Judith Paisley

 

As a ceramic artist, I enjoy throwing on the wheel however after an inspiring workshop with raku artist Britta Stolle Jacob, a turning point for me, I learned to appreciate the unlimited potential of hand building.  I prefer to work with semi sculptural one off pieces.  I find it has fewer boundaries and limited only by your imagination and adventurous spirit.

I have developed a strong passion for the raw and rustic nature of Raku and Alternative firings, however in the extreme seem heavily influence by the fine dramatic simplicity of the Oriental Style Art forms.  I combine both where possible along with the introduction of mixed media.  What I love about Raku is its close interaction with nature and the elements; the fact that the artist has so much physical input and influence throughout most of the process and that the final results are almost instantaneous.  With the serendipitous nature of the firing and the treatment in reduction, you can always expect unique one off pieces.

Rustic, earthy, textural surface treatments I find most appealing.  They evoke the basic raw organic and geological characteristics of the clay.  I also love contrast, as I am equally captivated by the pure simplistic and often transparent qualities of porcelain.  It has an almost Zen quality in its purest form and so absorbing.  It almost commands a simple form to portray its graceful integrity.  Its illusive quality requires the enth degree of patience and willingness to work with it, not against it.  It is not about command, but of profound empathy.  Learning "not to be too precious about my pieces" has allowed me to experiment, to learn and grow.  I’ve also learned, we are not in control, but part of the process.  We remain the eternal student and never stop learning.


Janet Pyke

Tea, hops and cocoa box.

Tea, hops and cocoa box.

I have been doing pottery off and on since 1969, mostly functional ware. Recently my work is more concerned with construction; fitting pieces together, multiples, and trying new and different techniques. I use both wheel and handbuilding and a wide variety of clays.  I find working with clay relaxing and stimulating and there are always hundreds of things to try coming to mind.


Patricia Ramos

Tectonic plate.

Tectonic plate.


Patsy Ross

I am relatively new to the world of ceramics but it was not long before I found my passion: creating whimsical creatures inspired by the animals I have encountered over the years.  

Each piece is unique with its own 'Perth'onality!


Dana Russell-Brown


Red desert.

Red desert.

Making interests me more than the product which is why I have always thought of myself as a maker or crafter not an artist. I like repetition both in process and design which reflects in my work, particularly the dot paintings. My love is in throwing yet I crave texture and am constantly trying to be more loose and free with my work.


Anne Ryan

 


Morphology with Weights.

Morphology with Weights.

Inspiration for my work is twofold, one organic where I am influenced by fossils and ancient rock formations and the whimsical , where the forms are based on the narrative “Down the Rabbit Hole” from Alice in Wonderland. Forms are made from raku and paperclay, “washed” with oxides and underglazes and once fired at a very high temperature.